Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has a complex treatment algorithm comprising many therapies, different combinations of which serve as first-, second-, and later-line treatments. Key therapeutic classes include corticosteroids, immunomodulators, thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs), and an orally administered Syk inhibitor (Rigel’s Tavalisse), which was approved for ITP in 2018 and offers patients a novel treatment option with a mechanism distinct from TPO-RAs. Developers seeking to better understand where and how effectively novel entrants to the ITP market are incorporated into the treatment algorithm will benefit from the insights offered in this content.

QUESTIONS ANSWERED

  • What patient shares do key therapies and brands garner by line of therapy in newly diagnosed ITP patients?
  • What are the quarterly trends in prescribing among recently treated and newly diagnosed ITP patients?
  • How has Tavalisse been integrated into the treatment algorithm, and what is its source of business?
  • What percentage of ITP patients receive drug therapy within one year of diagnosis, and how quickly? What percentage of patients progress to later lines of therapy within one year of diagnosis?
  • What percentage of ITP patients are treated with monotherapy versus combination therapy? What are the most commonly used combinations?
  • What are the product-level compliance and persistency rates among drug-treated patients?

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Treatment Algorithms: Claims Data Analysis provides detailed, quantitative analysis of the treatment journey and brand usage across lines of therapy and overall using real-world, patient-level claims data so that marketers can accurately assess their source of business, benchmark usage against competitors, and quantify areas of opportunity for their marketed or emerging brand.

Table of contents

  • Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura - Current Treatment - Detailed, Expanded Analysis - Treatment Algorithms - Claims Data Analysis (US)

Author(s): Steven F. Trueman, PhD

Steve is a member of Decision Resources Group’s Infectious, Niche, and Rare Diseases (INRD) team. Currently, he provides analyses and content production on infections caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the hepatitis C virus (HCV).

Steve conducted his postdoctoral research on models of neurodegenerative disease in the Department of Biochemistry at Brandeis University. He earned a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, where he studied protein translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum.