When I'm reading medtech news, I like to file away a few funny articles to bring up when the time seems right and I think that time is now. Medtech in general is a huge umbrella of products, including everything from huge, million-dollar MRI machines to the little needles they use for vascular access in hospitals available at a couple bucks a pop. Here are some choice articles from some of the crazier corners of medtech to brighten your day.

  1. If you're suffering from anxiety due to the appearance of your earlobes, fear not: Eartox is now a thing. Apparently, dermal fillers can now be used to plump up earlobes and give them a more youthful appearance. One of our managers here in Toronto pointed out that the name is a bit misleading though because it implies that the procedure uses botulinum toxin (better known as Botox) when it in fact uses dermal fillers.
  2. We covered microneedle patches in our latest drug delivery device report, which can potentially be used for a whole variety of applications in the future. However, one of the applications we did not cover was their apparent use to smooth skin and reduce the appearance of scarring. My skepticism of this product grew pretty high though based on their claim that it helps stimulate hair follicles on balding chia pets.
  3. Clinical trials are a reality in the medtech world, and come up especially frequently in cardiovascular device markets. Within the team here in Toronto, we've often remarked on how different clinical trial acronyms can be compared to the actual name of the trial. One author put together a funny little blog on the topic. Key points include that BATMAN is a trial name, but UNICORN is not.
  4. My fourth example isn't funny as much as it is really futuristic and connects innovations in ways you wouldn't expect. In this article, they talk about how 3-D printed organs won't really become a thing until self-driving cars become common. Why? Because right now, so many organs put in sick patients are donated from car accident victims, and the push to create 3-D organs therefore won't exist until that supply is gone.

I'm suddenly realizing that was a rather dark way of ending this post. Read the last article's paragraph about liver goo, it will make you feel better!

Happy Friday!

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